Plantar Fasciitis

Hello Friends,

 

Plantar fasciitis, a common heel pain for athletes and working people, can be excruciating and annoying the same time.  The plantar fascia is a thick ligament on the bottom of your foot.  It is a strong ligament that runs the length of your foot from the heel bone to the toes. Although it is strong, it is not very elastic and flexible. If it is repeatedly overstretched, it can become inflamed and painful, a condition is known as plantar fasciitis.

What will I feel with Plantar Fasciitis:

  • Sharp, stabbing pain on the bottom or side of the heel or in the arch of the foot.
  • Pain that is worse in the morning or after any period of inactivity.  As you begin to move around, the pain level usually improves.
  • Pain that gets worse after a prolonged period of standing, walking, or running.
  • Pain can last for several weeks or months and can range from mild to severe.

What Causes or contributes to Plantar fasciitis?

  • Excess weight.
  • Tight calf muscle and Achilles tendon.
  • Abnormal foot mechanics.  Flat feet or high arches can affect the way that pressure is distributed across your foot.
  • Inadequate footwear.  Excessively flat shoes that do not support your arch leave the plantar fascia unprotected.  A shoe with a medium heel can heighten the arch and decrease stress on the plantar fascia.
  • Specific sports activities.  Activites that put more pressure on your foot and require it to stretch repeatedly increase your risk.  These activities include running, walking long distance, jumping, tennis, basketball, and aerobics.
  • Standing all day.
  • The sudden change in activity.  Beginning an exercises program, such as high-impact aerobics, after a period of inactivity or changing your running surface from grass to road.

How long will it take to get better?

  • The problem can last from a few weeks to several months.  You can lessen the time for recovery by following these suggestions:

Specific Chiropractic Care

  • plantar fasciitis is usually the symptom of something higher up, i.e. ankles, knees, or even pelvis.
  • when the pelvis is rotated, it puts the excessive weight at the inner knee which ultimately collapses foot arches with the end result of flat feet.  Flat feet stretches fascia which then puts excessive weight and pressure and causes inflammation.
  • Specific chiropractic care of the foot, knee, and pelvis can restore bone alignments and integrity of arches.

Nutritional protocol

  • An anti-inflammatory diet is a must for plantar fasciitis.  Dark leafy greens such as kale, spinach, and Brussels sprouts are a good place to start.
  • Omega 3 such as fish oil is also a great anti-inflammatory substance to add on.
  • In addition to nature diet, you might also want to consider supplementation such as proteolytic enzyme bromelain, vitamin C, magnesium, and chondroitin sulfate.

Exercises:

  • Rehab exercises are crucial to enhance the outcome of the condition.  Here are some easy and effective exercises:
  • Calf and arch stretch.  Stretch 3-4 times each day.  Hold each position for 30-60 second and repeat 3 times in a session.
  • Stretch with your knee straight: stand with your hands on the wall.  Place one foot behind you.  Keep your heel on the ground and keep toes pointing straight ahead.  Bend your front knee to feel a stretch in the calf of the back leg.
  • Stretch with your knee bent: do as above with the back knee bent.
  • Arch stretch: stand with your toes of one foot against a step and your knee straight.  Place the arch of the other foot against the heel.  Bend the knee over the foot until you feel a stretch in your arch.
  • Toe crunches

Plantar Fasciitis is a debilitating condition which can hinder the quality of life.  This condition can help tremendously by proper chiropractic care, rehab exercises, and nutrition.  Any questions? Contact us at info@ICONchiropractic.com.

Yours in health,

Dr. Alan Wu DC
ICON Chiropractic Center

 

Posted in General Health, Gonstead Method, Health Talks.

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