Thyme Oil

Dear readers,

Thyme (pronounce as thīm) oil, is one powerful oil to have.  Thyme, besides it’s culinary property , it also has a pleasant smell and profound health benefits. It is one of nature’s most powerful antibacterial, anti fungal, antimicrobial agent (1, 2, 3).  In addition, it has also been documented to increase antioxidant levels in vi tro (4, 5).

Here are more facts about it:

Properties: Highly antibacterial, anti-fungal, antimicrobial, antiviral, and antiseptic.
Historical uses: It was used by the Egyptians for embalming and by the ancient Greeks to fight against infectious illnesses.  It has also been used for respiratory problems, digestive complaints, the prevention and treatment infection, dyspepsia, chronic gastritis, bronchitis, pertussis, asthma, laryngitis, tonsillitis, and enuresis in children.
French Medicinal use: Asthma, bronchitis, colitis, cystitis, dermatitis, dyspepsia, fatigue,
pleurisy, psoriasis, sciatica, tuberculosis, vaginal candida.
Body systems affected: Immune system, muscles and bones.

Comments from Dr. Alan Wu DC :

Winter is here and we want to help you prepare for this upcoming cold season.  Besides eating healthy, exercise, proper rest, good mental attitude and chiropractic care, it will also be great to have oils with strong antibacterial, anti-fungal and anti-microorganisms properties.  Clove, melaleuca (tee-tree oil), On-guard are all good to have.  We are providing you options because everyone has different preference on smell and body type.  As usual, check with your physician or doctors before start using these oils.  Other than that, enjoy these mother nature’s gifts and have a sound and safe holiday season.

 

Reference:

  1. Fabio et al., Screening of he antibacterial effects of a variety of essential oils on microorganism responsible for respiratory infections.  Phytother Res. 2007 Apr;21(4):374-7.
  2. Burt et al., Antibacterial activity of selected plant essential oils against Escherichia coli 0157:H7.  Lett Appl Microbiol. 2003;36(3):162-7
  3. Pinto et al., Antifungal activity of the clove essential oil from Syzygium aromaticum on Candida, Aspergillus and dermatophyte species. Journal of Medical Microbiology (2009), 58, 1454–1462
  4. Youdim et al., Dietary supplementation of thyme (Thymus vulgarisms L.) essential oil during the lifetime of the rat: its effects on the antioxidant status in liver, kidney and heart tissues. Mech Ageing Dev. 1999 Sep 8;109(3):163-75.
  5. Youdim et al., Effect of thyme oil and thymol dietary supplementation on the antioxidant status and fatty acid composition of the aging rat brain. Br J Nutr. 2000 Jan;83(1):87-93.

 

 

Posted in Essential Oils, General Health, Health Talks.

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